How To Make Your LinkedIn Profile Attractive To Recruiters (According To Actual Recruiters)

How To Make Your LinkedIn Profile Attractive To Recruiters (According To Actual Recruiters)

If you’re looking for a new job, trying to attract the attention of recruiters on LinkedIn is a great first step into that new position. With that being said, there are only so many recruiters on LinkedIn and a plethora of qualified candidates for the positions they are working to fill. Despite a slight imbalance in positions-to-candidates, it is still a candidate’s market. How do you make your LinkedIn profile attractive to recruiters? Rather than speculate, we talked to five experienced technical recruiters from OakTree Staffing & Training in Tulsa, OK to determine how you can make your LinkedIn profile as appealing and attractive as possible.

1. What would you consider to be red flags in someone’s LinkedIn profile?

kamron cox tulsa it recruiter
Kamron Cox, Senior Technical Recruiter

“Probably a bad profile picture. LinkedIn is not your Facebook account — it’s a professional account and the more professional you can appear the more likely someone will reach out. Also, keep it simple. There’s no need to put down you live with 15 cats or something like that.”
— Kamron Cox, Senior Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

“Red flags for a LinkedIn profile would be pretty similar to a resume – job hopping and gaps.”
— Chase Wagner, Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

“Something that makes me more likely to look at someone’s LinkedIn profile —
professional profile picture. It doesn’t have to be professionally taken, but a picture of them. Not their favorite sports team, or a cartoon picture.”
— Cassy Hendrix, Direct-Hire Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

2. What parts of their LinkedIn profile show you that they take their profile seriously?

“When someone takes the time to point out exactly what they are doing, working with, and their day-to-day, that shows me that they take their LinkedIn profile seriously. It’s like an elevator pitch — keep the content about your specific accomplishments, tasks, etc.”
— Kamron Cox, Senior Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

“Things that make me think people take their LinkedIn profile seriously – they have a picture, a detailed introduction that tells me what they want, lots of detail about their current and past positions, and a detailed ‘skills’ section. The more detail the more they seem to take it seriously.”
— Chase Wagner, Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

“Using the ‘skills’ section to highlight what one does shows me that they take their LinkedIn profile seriously. A lot of people don’t list their job duties as they would on a resume, but the ‘skills’ section is where the keywords will pick up, making individuals pull in searches.”
— Cassy Hendrix, Direct-Hire Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

3. When looking at someone’s LinkedIn profile, what part do you look at first, second, third, etc? — and, briefly, what are some green lights/red lights along the way?

“I look mostly at their current role and see what they are doing now. Going down from there, I see how much of what I’m looking for is relevant in their career. I see how they present themselves — depending on the role and the client’s expectations of that person’s professional appearance. I also look at the longevity of that person’s career. There is a difference between a job hopper and a road warrior — one who travels for work or just likes doing contract work.”
— Kamron Cox, Senior Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

chase wagner tulsa recruiter
Chase Wagner, Technical Recruiter

“First thing I look at is the profile picture, but that’s just because it’s the first thing on the page — you should always have a professional picture on your LinkedIn profile. (The amount of Snapchat-filtered profile pictures I’ve seen is ridiculous.) Next, I look at the introduction. Generally, there are no red lights there unless they flat out say something that contradicts what I’m looking for. For example, if someone spells out they’re looking for remote only and my position isn’t remote, I generally only reach out as a last resort type measure.
Then I go down to the job history. That’s the real make or break. I want to see consistent work history or at least small gaps between jobs. I also like to see at least a year or more at the places they’ve worked.”
— Chase Wagner, Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

“Have connections. I am much less likely to reach out to someone who doesn’t have many connections because it indicates they are not active on LinkedIn.”
— Cassy Hendrix, Direct-Hire Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

4. What is any other advice you would give a candidate wanting to specifically stand out to recruiters?

“Make your LinkedIn profile specific and to the point. Use a bullet-point-type style so it’s easy for people to read through your profile. Most recruiters will scan and go. If you are precise and direct, it’s easy to get someone’s attention. Also, having good recommendations from previous employers is good as well.”
— Kamron Cox, Senior Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

“The best advice I could give someone in regards to their LinkedIn profile is to try and be as detailed as possible when crafting your profile. The more detail, the better because that could be your first impression. You really want to impress the person looking at it.”
— Chase Wagner, Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training

cassy hendrix direct hire recruiter tulsa
Cassy Hendrix, Direct-Hire Technical Recruiter

“If you are a passive/active job seeker, the more information you put in your LinkedIn profile, the more likely a recruiter will reach out to you. List your profile as ‘open to new opportunities’ with as much information about what you are looking for as you can. Check your messages frequently if you are looking for a new position. Some areas I would consider red flags are typically when someone has inaccurate information, an unprofessional LinkedIn profile picture, or just lack of information in general. Also, when someone has hoppy work experience, be sure to specify ‘contract’ that is the reason, or layoff, etc.”
— Cassy Hendrix, Direct-Hire Technical Recruiter, OakTree Staffing & Training


For additional help making your LinkedIn profile attractive to recruiters, feel free to contact us for assistance. The career professionals at OakTree Staffing & Training headquartered in Tulsa, OK are excited to help you not only find but also land that incredible job.

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